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  • “We should not pervert our traditional medicine gifts for healing. Sickness is on the cigarette side and wellness is on the traditional side.” Artist: Ravenwolf Tribe: KoyukanAthabaskan-Muscogee
  • The Raven is a mystical creature known by many tribes as a magician, as well as a story teller. Artist: Ravenwolf Tribe: Koyukan Athabaskan-Muscogee Creek
  • The Red Road is a phrase used by many Native American people to describe a way of life. The Red Road represents walking in balance, and for many people it represents living a clean and sober lifestyle. Artist: Ravenwolf Tribe: Koyukan Athabaskan-Muscogee Creek
  • Native Americans refer to the earth as Mother Earth. The earth is a feminine symbol, and Native people consider themselves to be caretakers of the Earth. We must care for her and respect her… love her. Her beauty and bounty is beyond comprehension. Her medicine and life blood (water) is essential to all who inhabit her. Artist: Dirk Tribe: Blackfoot
  • Galvin is an aspiring young artist who donated several pieces of art to Red Lodge on behalf of the Women’s Transition House Fund. This beautiful reproduction is created from an antique portrait of a young warrior. Artist: Lomboy Tribe: Grand Ronde
  • Dreaming of a beautiful future for our Native women. This picture is Mr. Walker’s interpretation of what he ‘envisions’ for Red Lodge Transition Services. Mr. Walker states he is the great, great grandson of Crazy Horse. Artist: D. Walker Tribe: Lakota Sioux
  • Raven is considered a mystical and magical creature. It is the guardian of ceremonial magic. Raven is a trickster, a shape shifter…. Raven is also considered a story teller. Raven has been around since the beginning of time. Artist: Ravenwolf Tribe: Koyukan Athabaskan-Muscogee Creek
  • The heartbeat of the drum calls forth ancestors deep inside this young man as he prepares to enter the dance arena. Dancing is considered a religious and cultural practice among all tribes and clans. Artist: Phoenix Tribe: Unknown
  • Native Americans photographed by Edward S. Curtis called him ‘shadow catcher’, but the images he captured were far more powerful than mere shadows. The men, women, and children seem as alive today as when Curtis took their pictures in the early part of the 20th century. Artist: Lomboy Tribe: Grand Ronde
  • This Wishram bride is wearing her wealth which appears to be considerable. She is wearing many hundred dentalia shells, shell disc beads, and lazy stitch beads. Her wedding cap is adorned with Chinese coins. Behind her is a mat made of tules sewn together.The Wishram people lived on the Washington side of the Columbia at the Dalles. Artist: Howell Tribe: The Friar
  • “Looks Within” is about introspection and awakening the spirit. “Looks Within” was presented to Red Lodge Transition Services on August 4th, 2012 at the 28th Annual Big Yard Pow Wow by the Lakota Club, behind the Iron Doors of the Oregon State Penitentiary (O.S.P.). The Lakota Club is one of the oldest Activities clubs functioning today behind the massive grey walls that surround this historic correctional facility; a fully functioning city that houses almost 3,000 men. Community Artist: Griggs Tribe: Cherokee Descendent
  • One of the old Ojibwa traditions was to hang a dream catcher in their homes. They believe that the night air is filled with dreams both good and bad. The dream catcher, when hung, moves freely in the air and catches the dreams as they float by. The good dreams know the way and slip through the center hole and slide down off the soft feather so gently the sleeper below sometimes hardly knows he is dreaming. Artist: Bobby Tribe: Turtle Mountain Chippewa