Native American Art

  • The Raven is a mystical creature known by many tribes as a magician, as well as a story teller. “A great magician stole the sun, the moon, and the stars, from the earth. The people became sick without heat and light, and they were lonely for the stars and the guidance of the moon. Raven was sent to steal back the sun, moon and stars. He turned himself into a baby and tricked the magician into giving them to him, then promptly returned them to the people on earth”. Raven is revered as a strong animal spirit among many tribes, especially tribes within the Pacific Northwest, Alaska and Canada. Community Artist: Pat Sky - Feather Star Woman Tribe: Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma
  • Children are considered a sacred gift from the Creator. Young ones are always included in ceremonial practices. It is not unusual to see small Native children sleeping soundly during Pow Wows and Ceremonies, as the drumming and singing continue throughout the night. Artist: Victor Tribe: Unknown
  • Many tribal creation stories tell us that Earth was born on the back of turtle. Since turtle carries its home on its back, it has also been recognized as having the ability to ‘manage’ in difficult circumstances. Turtle symbolizes both new beginnings and endings. It is through the ending of something that allows space for something new to arise. Artist: Mary Stanton 1965 - 2011 Tribe: Grand Ronde
  • Raven is revered as a strong mystical, magical animal spirit among many tribes, especially tribes within the Pacific Northwest, Alaska and Canada. Raven is known to be a guardian of ceremonial magic and is one of the most powerful totems or symbols of Native American culture. Raven is a trickster, a shape shifter… There are many Native American legends and stories shared about raven… like the one about Raven the trickster, who ends up stealing the sun, moon and stars from a great magician and returning them to the People… or a creation story about how Raven created man, woman and the world for us to live on. Artist: Guzman Tribe: Yaqui / Cherokee
  • Galvin is an aspiring young artist who donated several pieces of art to Red Lodge on behalf of the Women’s Transition House Fund. This beautiful reproduction is created from an antique portrait of a young warrior. Artist: Lomboy Tribe: Grand Ronde
  • The wolf is a powerful symbol for Native Americans. It represents power and protection among many tribes. Artist: Tami Tribe: Unknown
  • This Wishram bride is wearing her wealth which appears to be considerable. She is wearing many hundred dentalia shells, shell disc beads, and lazy stitch beads. Her wedding cap is adorned with Chinese coins. Behind her is a mat made of tules sewn together.The Wishram people lived on the Washington side of the Columbia at the Dalles. Artist: Howell Tribe: The Friar
  • Dreaming of a beautiful future for our Native women. This picture is Mr. Walker’s interpretation of what he ‘envisions’ for Red Lodge Transition Services. Mr. Walker states he is the great, great grandson of Crazy Horse. Artist: D. Walker Tribe: Lakota Sioux
  • “We should not pervert our traditional medicine gifts for healing. Sickness is on the cigarette side and wellness is on the traditional side.” Artist: Ravenwolf Tribe: KoyukanAthabaskan-Muscogee
  • The Raven is a mystical creature known by many tribes as a magician, as well as a story teller. Artist: Ravenwolf Tribe: Koyukan Athabaskan-Muscogee Creek
  • Taste of Freedom | #16

    Salmon is one of the four sacred foods used by the Indigenous people of the Columbia River Basin during their Longhouse worship ceremonies. Artist: Joseph Tribe: Unknown